The word: what does “sustainability” really mean?

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Sustainability. It’s a buzz word, a word we hear so often.

We hear it used by environmentalists, politicians, fortune 500 companies, and our hipster friends. We hear this word nearly every day and yet do we ever hear anyone really define it? Do we know what sustainability really means?

At Ember Arts we talk about sustainability quite a bit. It’s something we strive for, it’s in our mission statement, it’s what we value.

Now sustainability can mean something different to different people. But we wanted to let you in to the world of Ember, to what sustainability means to us.

What sustainability means to Ember Arts.

At Ember Arts we believe that sustainability applies to the way we care for the earth and also the people around us. We think it’s so important to create products in ways that will protect natural resources, promote reusing and up-cycling materials, and discourage waste. 

We also believe that sustainability should not just be an ecological goal, but also a relational one. At Ember Arts, we want to build sustainable relationships with people — friendships that last and thrive. By being compassionate, steadfast, and authentic we believe that whole communities of people can work together to achieve positive social change. 

“Sustainability is our long term goal. We want Ember Arts to be a launching point for the women we work with in Uganda and for our family and staff here in America. We want to see their time with Ember build skill sets, confidence, and self worth that allows them to move forward, dream big, and accomplish any goal.”

- Jessica Connolly, Ember Arts Co-Founder

We are enabling 28 Ugandan women to live sustainable lives.

When you really break it down, the word sustainable is all about support, strength, longevity, and the ability to continually survive and thrive. This is what Ember Arts strives to be for our Ugandan partners. Before Ember Arts existed, our artisans worked in a rock quarry where they would sit in the hot sun with a makeshift hammer, pounding stones into gravel. Making less than $1 a day, the women were barely able to stay alive.

Now, with the money they make from Ember Arts, the women’s lives are being sustained. They have enough food on the table, they’re building homes, their children are going to school, and they are investing money into new businesses. These women, their families, and their entire community are now living sustainable lives.

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How we practice sustainability in our business.

Although we’re not perfect, and we’re learning new business practices everyday, Ember Arts does several things in an effort to be sustainable.

For instance, we have a tiny office with just the essentials, enabling us to keep our wastes to a minimum and save  on resources like electricity and water.

Most of us who work at Ember Arts, live in the community where our office is, which means we ride our bikes and walk to work. Sustainable commuting!

And probably the most important way we incorporate sustainability in our business is through the design of our jewelry. Apart from things like metal clasps and earring hooks, all of the materials we use in creating Ember jewelry are up-cycled and recycled goods. Using materials that are locally sourced like recycled paper, seeds, and wood, our designs are extremely sustainable, cost effective, and leave no waste.

Next time you hear the word sustainability, ask yourself what it could mean, and what you can do to practice sustainable living.

Ember Ambassadors West Coast Road Trip!

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Did you know that Ember Arts is a family owned and operated business?

Clayton and Jessica Connolly (together with their parents, daughters, siblings, an artist in Uganda, and a couple of college students) bring life to the business and story of Ember Arts. Together they are empowering dreamers and working to build a compassionate, sustainable network of individuals who can make a positive impact in their world.

During the whole month of August the Connolly family is taking the Ember Arts story and hitting the road. They’re calling this adventure the Ember Ambassadors West Coast Road Trip.

Read some more about Ember Ambassadors as the Connolly’s share their plans for their road trip:

What are three reasons why you are taking your family and your business on a month-long road trip? 

1. We simply love being on the road and seeing new places. Our girls have so much fun playing road games like “I Spy” and blasting music while singing along. We also believe that traveling to new places and seeing new sites is so enriching to young minds. We want our daughters to grow up knowing how big the world is and valuing every single person they come across during life.

2. Ember Arts is in a stage of expansion, a time when we are striving to grow our business and further our sphere of influence. Simply put, we want to see our jewelry sold in more stores, so we’re going out adventuring in search of those new partners.

3. Also, from past experiences we’ve learned that individuals are more likely to purchase a product when they can shake the hand of the person who is selling. We so value meeting with people face to face, sharing stories, and building relationships. We want to be as authentic and intentional as possible when interacting with our partners and customers. What a better way to build relationships than to simply stop by and say hi.

Meet the Connolly family - Clayton, Jessica, Kairah, Shiloh, and River. If you're on the West Coast, be keeping your eyes out for them.

Meet the Connolly family – Clayton, Jessica, Kairah, Shiloh, and River. If you’re on the West Coast, be keeping your eyes out for them.

Give us a glimpse into your travel plans. What will you be doing? 

Our plan is to drive up the West Coast of the United States, starting in our home base of  San Diego and ending in Seattle. We are hoping to stop in as many towns and cities as possible, meeting with retail store owners. We’ll shake lots of hands, pass out business cards, and give away free jewelry, all with the intention of sharing the Ember Arts story.

Your road trip sounds amazing! How can I join in on the fun? 

We would love to have you become a part of the Ember Ambassadors story. Here a couple of ways you can join us.

1. Follow us on Instagram (@emberarts) and on Facebook (search Ember Arts) to see fun photos of our trip.

2. Help us make our travel plans, tell us where we should go! Do you have a favorite boutique, bookstore, or gift shop on the West Coast that you think should sell Ember Arts jewelry? Let us know and we’ll try to stop by that store. You can send us your thoughts by emailing info@emberarts.com or commenting on any of our social media posts.

Designing Jewelry, Inspiring Dreams

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This is Emily Grace Goodrich — designer and dreamer. She is the creative mind behind Ember Arts and has served as our jewelry designer in Kampala, Uganda for the past five years. She brings color, vibrancy, and ingenuity to both our products and the Ember Arts story.

Not a single day is the same for Emily, living in Uganda, though every morning she wakes to the sound of chickens clucking. She will often take a white minivan taxi into town to visit the Owina Market, where she searches for used paper and old books to use in Ember Arts designs. Several times a week she travels to the outskirts of the city to a neighborhood called Acholi Quarters, where the women of Ember Arts work and live. Emily is there to conduct meetings and train the women on crafting jewelry. It is a lifestyle she loves — something so much more than a job.

We are so very proud to have Emily on our team and are grateful for the beauty she brings to the Ember Arts family.

Ember Arts: You studied Interdisciplinary Studio Arts in college – do any of the skills you learned in school influence the way you design Ember Arts jewelry?

Emily Goodrich: I think there are similarities in some ways. I mostly studied painting and photography, but things like color and pattern and line are applicable across all creative fields. I think my designs are a lot more influenced by the ebb and flow of materials into Uganda. It’s tricky to figure out which jewelry components will be available in the local markets consistently; and so more and more, I’m trying to look toward alternative sorts of materials. 

emilyWhat is something you’ve learned from the Ugandan women you work with?

I’ve definitely learned a lot about hospitality and resilience from them, but lately, we’ve been learning together the value of celebration. This last year has had its fair share of bumps and challenges for the group and for individuals in it, but we’ve decided to start bringing a little fun into our meetings. We threw a small party the last time an order shipped to the U.S., and had refreshments and played a few silly games. The ladies have decided that this should be standard: they’re usually focused on business, and they realized that it’s important to enjoy each other’s presence.

 

When you talk to your friends and family in America, what is one thing you wish they would know or understand about the state of life in Uganda? 

No matter how many times I say otherwise, people still think I live in a mud hut. There are certainly people here that do, but Uganda is growing and changing. It’s a place of strange juxtapositions.

Uganda has its fair share of dirt roads, slums, and political struggles, but every single one of the women we work with has a mobile phone, and they know how to send text messages and mobile money. A lot of them have TVs and stereos in their homes, and are sitting and watching Columbian telenovelas and other international television shows during lunch. There are also opportunities for entrepreneurs and enterprising folks everywhere. 

This is why I think the work that we’re doing at Ember Arts  is so important. Most of the Ember ladies are content to move back to the village one day, but their children are going to inherit this new world of technology and rapidly changing information — even here in Uganda. When these women who we work with are able to send their kids  to secondary schools and universities, I think it helps to ensure those children a voice in the future of their country.

There is a lot of room to do some good in the world with our purchasing power.

 

Someday you’ll be moving away from Kampala. What’s next on your list of adventures? What are you dreaming of doing? 

I really enjoy “making things,” so I think I’ll always be interested in the way that human beings interact with one another as consumers and producers. There is a lot of room to do some good in the world with our purchasing power. There are also a lot of ways to do harm. Eventually, I’d love to figure out how to make those ideas more accessible to people, especially when the assumption is that things like organic and fair trade have to equal expensive. There’s a whole lot for me to think through before I have any concrete steps, but I’ve been fortunate to have some amazing experiences in those areas. I’d love to share them in a tangible way, with a blog or maybe even a retail space.

What is one piece of advice you can give to others who are dreaming of making a positive impact on the world? 

Stop dreaming about it, and just start moving forward. I often find myself getting stuck in the realm of “maybe someday,” and I’m learning that even baby steps will get you there faster than waiting for the right time or enough resources. If you need money, start putting change in a jar. If you’re waiting for more free time, spend just fifteen minutes a day working toward that goal. Little things add up.

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Agnes Dreams of Education

The first thing you’ll notice about Agnes is her great sense of style. She’s always well put together, or as they say in Uganda, “looking smart.” Perhaps this is because she has a designers eye; in addition to her work with Ember Arts, she is constantly making jewelry of her own and testing out new ideas. Her creativity, though, is well balanced by a gifted mind that constantly seeks out opportunities to learn new things.

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At every meeting in Acholi Quarters, you’ll find Agnes huddled over a notebook, adding figures or taking records. These days, she’s the person you call to organize a meeting, or the representative sent to town to purchase supplies like earring hooks and string for the group. She has a quick wit and a good sense of humor, and has made herself an invaluable part of the beadmaking group.

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Though she’s easily the best with words and numbers, it’s surprising to learn that she was never able to finish school. For awhile, she was overcome by challenges, and didn’t have the opportunity to pursue her own dreams. These days, though, she is happy to see her children in school, and dreams of finishing her own studies, too. She’s working toward that goal, and even daring to dream smaller things along the way: she’s set her sights on getting access to a computer, and learning to use email, Excel, and other programs that can help her with her work.

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Ember Mother: Paska

Nearly all of the women we partner with through Ember Arts are mothers, and part of the privilege of working with them is the opportunity to see their children grow throughout the years. We frequently have babies and toddlers teetering through the office, and during training sessions, older children stop buy regularly to deliver messages from home and watch their mothers at work.

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Achiro Paska’s two youngest daughters, Emily and Evelin, have been staples at our meetings over the last few years, and she was happy to be asked to show them off and speak more about their lives.

When prompted to share her favorite part about being a mother, Paska couldn’t choose; from pregnancy to teenagers, so far, she’s loved it all. With six children from ages 14 months to 14 years,  she has certainly seen motherhood from many different angles. While she admits to getting annoyed when her children are quarreling with each other, most days she is happy to see them playing well together. They even have a favorite game that she couldn’t quite explain through her laughter, apparently it’s so funny that even the thought of it makes her giggle.

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Paska herself was left with relatives at the age of three, and grew up without a mother. She is determined to live her life differently, no matter what sort of trials she faces. Her advice to other mothers is “Love your children, whatever you are facing, and educate them. If you educate and love them it is good, because they are the future.”

She is most proud of her children when they do well in school,  and working to earn money for their school fees is her greatest concern. Her dream is that they will all finish their educations, and never have to struggle the way she did growing up. 

We are thrilled to be partnering alongside hard-working mothers like Paska, and so grateful for the support of all the women- mothers and otherwise- that help make those dreams a reality.

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Morgan Coleman Turns Insecurity Into Art

morgan_coleman_4When I meet her in a funky little bar in the Paseo district of Oklahoma City, Morgan Coleman has purple hair and she doesn’t talk like a poet. She talks with the same use of cliche and personal verbal tics we all do. And she talks with a mix of pride and humility about her childhood, a mix that seems both familiar and out of place.

It’s a childhood that inspired lines like these, which she delivers into a microphone in a small, crowded room painted with gnomes:

“it’s a shade that follows you through your life
a tattoo on your scared flesh
typing different over paper like that’s your new name
Like this was just a shift in the stars
when you can only see black night skies”

Morgan Coleman is a poet, and she maps the harder parts of her life experience with gymnastic words, bent and tumbled to fit the challenges she’s faced. “I haven’t had the easiest life,” Morgan told me.

As her story unfolds I find out what she meant: alcoholism and violence in her childhood home in Connecticut; working from a young age and spending nights under a bridge a mile away because that felt safer than her bedroom; close brushes with suicide, a stay in a home for troubled youth, and the long loneliness of feeling, and being treated as, different.

But these hard circumstances are not the whole of her story, even during her younger years. Morgan was very bright. She attended a magnet school focused on global studies and traveled to various countries and all around the US. After high school she helped lead trips of American high school students to Europe, where they studied geology through extended field trips to places like the Alps.

When she was 21 her parents divorced and her mom made a quick move to Oklahoma. Morgan moved with her, and through her job at Barnes and Noble she got plugged into the local poetry scene.

morgan_coleman_performing_1_webOklahoma is a very conservative place, a very conservative-American-evangelical-Christian place, the sort of place where people expect you to have a good job, a happy heterosexual family, and a favorite college football team with Oklahoma in the name. And it goes without saying that you attend a good, strong church every Sunday. If your life doesn’t look like this picture it can be hard to feel at home.

The poetry scene in and around Oklahoma City is filled with people who, one way or another, don’t feel at home. They’re often more liberal, less Christian, less heterosexual, and less concerned with college sports. Because of this, Morgan tells me, there’s a deep value placed on vulnerability and acceptance throughout Oklahoma’s poetry community. The people who come to share and listen to poetry are really there to connect, to find people who feel out of place like they do.

And this is why Morgan found so much space to breathe here. She is an outsider. She doesn’t fit the conservative Christian mold. She has purple hair. In Oklahoma’s poetry community, Morgan found a place where the ways in which she felt insecure and hurt and alienated became the sources of art and beauty.

Late last year, in between studying for a career in chemical engineering, Morgan won the chance to represent Oklahoma at the Women of the World Poetry Slam. The poems she wrote and performed about all the hardest parts of her life have lifted her up as a sort of hero.

And this is why, when she tells me about a childhood that leaves me fumbling for words, she talks with that mix of pride and humility. It’s the same mix you hear from people who have accomplished something great, like building a company or getting a novel published. It felt strange to hear that tone when she told me stories of alcohol and abuse.

But, Morgan tells me near the end of our conversation, she doesn’t wish for a different childhood. That one was hers. And not only did she survive it, but she is transforming it into art, into beauty, into a way to connect with other people who share similar wounds. With it, she is accomplishing something great.

Buy Morgan’s latest book of poetry and help send her to WOWPS here! http://emberarts.com/store/busting-out/

Lindsay Branham Helps Child Soldiers Find Home Again

 We’re giving 50% of our online sales for one month to Lindsay’s Mobile Cinema project. Shop here.Lindsay Branham, Ember Hero

Shooting was stalled, and Lindsay Branham and her team of New York filmmakers were stuck in a village in the struggling and beautiful Republic of South Sudan. Their production schedule demanded action, but local government officers were threatening to shut them down completely. They had come to film a story about an abducted child soldier returning home, not for Sundance or box office glory, but as a tool to help people in Central Africa recover from the very real abductions and violence they had endured at the hands of the Lord’s Resistance Army.

“In the shadowlands of pain and despair we find slow, dark beauty,” wrote Irish Poet John O’Donohue, in a quote Lindsay shared with me by email. “Beauty,” he continued, “triumphs over the suffering inherent in life.” In the LRA’s ongoing brutality in Central Africa, Lindsay found staggering depths of pain. She brought the film crew to capture the triumph of reconciliation and healing, of beauty, and to help it along.

The LRA is notorious for abducting children and forcing them to commit violent acts against their own families and communities. Lindsay and her partners, including the Congolese organization SAIPED, create beautiful short films that capture these traumas, and that illustrate a path to recovery. Together with techniques like role playing and community discussion, these films help people, families, and communities navigate the emotional minefield of losing their children and, sometimes, seeing theme escape and return home. She calls it the Mobile Cinema project, and she created it as part of her work with Discover the Journey, a non-profit network of media makers and storytellers that works to change the lives of children in conflict.

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“After the very last meeting, when we were told we would not be able to continue the project, I walked out to our car and finally just cried,” said Lindsay. They had already cast villagers for the film, and she felt that she was letting them down, along with their whole community.

When she got back to the village she called a community meeting with the cast to break the news. One by one, cast members expressed their sadness. Samson, the young teenage boy who’d been cast in the lead role, started to cry. His brother had been abducted by the LRA and was still missing, he said. He saw his role in the film as a way to honor his brother by helping others who’d been through his trauma.

“To make meaning from [pain] was something sacred,” said Lindsay, “and I hadn’t seen that or predicted how deeply people would want that until we were there sitting in the grass saying we were leaving.”

They had eleven days left for a shoot that needed three weeks. The next morning they flew from South Sudan to the Democratic Republic of Congo and started auditions that afternoon. “Thankfully,” said Lindsay, “the actors we ended up working with in Congo showed the same level of zeal and excitement for the vision. And it only communicated to me just how much people want to be agents in their own healing process.” They shot into early mornings and, with the help of a heroic Congolese producer and translator, finished a film about a child soldier’s tumultuous return to the home he’d been ripped away from, a film that will promote healing throughout the region.

In a conversation that spanned a number of emails and a rainy-day interview in Uganda, I asked Lindsay why it’s worth it to her to engage with such painful stories, to really care about these people and so to take on an element of their suffering.

I keep myself open to pain, and beauty in pain, because I loose my own humanity if I don’t,” said Lindsay. “If it’s the natural rhythm of life to die and live and die and live and die and live—our cells are constantly dying and being regenerated, plants are dying and being regenerated, that seems to be the cycle, the way our world functions—do we not also have to have our own souls and hearts die in order to fully live?

Shop our brand new products by December 11 and we’ll donate 50% of your purchase to support Lindsay’s work. And see Lindsay’s first Mobile Cinema film here.

Dreamer: Kerry Docherty, Mindfulness Mentor

Dreamer Kerry Docherty, Mindfulness Mentor

Think about an orange-robed monk meditating quietly in a temple in the green hills of Thailand. Now, imagine the exact opposite person. You might think of someone in a dark suit barking into a cell phone and hustling through a big, crowded city. Someone like a lawyer in New York. These two would seem to live in different worlds, but Kerry Docherty is building a bridge between them.

The year before she started Pepperdine Law School she spent three months in Thailand, ending with a week in a Buddhist monastery. “I had nothing to do all day but sit with my thoughts and meditate,” she told me by email. “What a struggle!” But this introduction to the usually unnoticed workings of her own mind stuck with her, and during law school she started training at UCLA’s Mindful Awareness Research Center.

The practice of mindfulness helped Kerry handle the stress and competitiveness of law school, and she continued the practice when she moved to New York to clerk for a judge in Brooklyn. The judge’s daughter was applying for college at the time and Kerry taught her the basics of mindfulness to help handle the stress, which proved very helpful. “Most of our lives,” Kerry said, “we are told to ‘calm down,’ ‘pay attention’ and ‘chill out,’ but we never learn how to do these things.” Kerry wondered if there was a market for this kind of training, and a way to unite her two worlds into one pursuit. She started exploring mindfulness training as a business.

“Walking away from a financially stable and comfortable career was scary, exhausting, energizing, and empowering,” she said. “My biggest obstacle has always been myself, particularly self-doubt and people pleasing. But at some point I just accepted that I can still have self-doubt and move forward.” She said that the day she decided to put aside her law career and fully commit to her new pursuit was the day doors started to open. Now she works full time on her business, The Mindful Mentors, teaching the practice of mindfulness to everyone from busy professionals to a class of fifth graders.

When practicing mindfulness, says Kerry, “we’re learning about ourselves and about the fleetingness of emotions; we’re learning that there is beauty in the mundane moments of the day; and we’re learning that there is a place inside of us that is always okay, even when the world isn’t.” Kerry is injecting the world of the monk into the chaos of modern American life, uniting the two worlds she lives in. And, fittingly, one of her key client groups is New York City lawyers.

Connect with Kerry using the form below. Send her a question on mindfulness, an encouraging word, or order one of her guided meditation CDs—one for adults and one for mindful youngsters.
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Our First Podcast: A Conversation With Ember Hero Rachel Goble

Rachel Goble cofounded The SOLD Project to help prevent the sex trafficking of kids in northern Thailand. We chose her as our latest Ember Hero. All this month, we’re donating 50% of our online sales to further her work with The SOLD Project.

I had the pleasure to chat with Rachel over Google Voice. She had just returned from Thailand and I was in Kampala, Uganda. Isn’t technology amazing? We talked about her background, how and why she started The SOLD Project, and how hope informs her work and life. I hope you enjoy.

Rachel Goble, Ember Hero

Ember Hero: Rachel Goble Keeps Children Out of Brothels

Shop here and 50% of your purchase will be donated to support Rachel’s trafficking prevention work at SOLD.Rachel Goble, Ember HeroEarlier this year, in a small, green village in the hills of northern Thailand, a woman approached a 14-year-old girl and made her a simple offer. She could earn the equivalent of $1,000 dollars, the woman told her, for losing her virginity to a paying customer. This woman wasn’t going to forcibly kidnap her. The girl had the choice to say yes or no.

Silicon Valley native Rachel Goble, through her organization The SOLD Project, is working to educate Thai girls on the real terms of offers like these—that they won’t be paid $1,000, that they’ll likely be confined to a brothel for years and forced to sleep with not just one, but thousands of paying customers, that accepting one of these offers will lead to new kinds of pain and poverty, the kinds that tear not just at the stomach, but at the soul.

Rachel’s childhood was at the opposite end of nearly every spectrum from the poor, undereducated Thai girls most at risk of being trafficked. Her parents run Goble Properties, a San Jose commercial real estate company founded by her grandfather. The business afforded Rachel an idyllic childhood. “I lived down the street from some of my best friends,” she told me, “and so evenings and weekends were spent riding bikes between each others’ houses and getting into mischief.”

Rachel Goble, Ember HeroRachel’s parents also had a unique passion that took her into a much larger world. “Some of my earliest memories are tromping through jungles looking for land while a Mayan man would swing a machete only inches from my head to clear a path,” Rachel recalled. Her parents began exploring the connections between the environmental damage and poverty in the Central American country of Belize. Rachel took her first of many trips to Belize when she was only nine.

By Rachel’s teenage years the Gobles had built Jaguar Creek, a sustainable center in the jungle to host teams from universities and churches around the world, who would come to learn how environmental degradation contributes to extreme poverty. Belize, Rachel said, was her second home. Her passport was completely filled with stamps by age fifteen. And she told me that her time there gave her a great and lasting gift: a sort of naivety in regards to cultural and socioeconomic boundaries, a comfort amidst difference.

It was this foundational comfort that allowed her to find one of the world’s most uncomfortable places, a place whose desperation became her calling. While traveling in India as part of her postgraduate work at Fuller Theological Seminary, Rachel visited a brothel. “We walked up sets of stairs to a hallway lined with rooms,” she recalled. “Each of these rooms was a waiting area that then had multiple doors that opened to bedrooms. This was where the women slept, as well as took customers.”

She sat down with two of the women in a waiting room and asked them their stories. One of the them, still in her early twenties and already a brothel veteran, said that unlike Rachel she had no opportunity, no way out. Although there were no bars or chains, she was trapped.

Trafficking is, in economic terms, people with opportunity and resources preying on those without, or put more simply, the rich paying to sleep with the poor. And Rachel, who had grown up with so much opportunity, now faced a woman whose life was shaped by the absence of opportunity. The consequences were unbearable. “I realized then that prevention was my calling,” said Rachel. “That no person should ever get to a place in their life where they’ve lost hope.”

About that same time Rachel was introduced to another Rachel, filmmaker Rachel Sparks, who was producing a film about trafficking in Thailand. When they both returned to the States they connected over similar experiences, and very similar conclusions: that trafficking is enabled by poverty, lack of education, a fundamental devaluation of girls and women, and that preventing trafficking starts with empowering girls.

In northern Thailand many families can’t afford much education, and by age 15 girls often have no choice but to drop out of school and start making an income for the family. But without the skills that a good education provides their chances to make money are extremely limited.

Student in Northern Thailand

Rachel signed on to help produce the documentary, and to start a non-profit alongside the film to start doing the work of education and empowerment—the work of prevention—in Thailand. Today that non-profit, The SOLD Project, has 140 students on scholarship, giving them the education that might save them from the world of trafficking and prostitution. These students get mentored by staff and older students, and have access to a resource center that gives them a fun and encouraging place to spend their non-school hours. SOLD also teaches the communities where they work about the tricks and terrors of trafficking, helping bind them together in a sort of safety net of prevention.

The 14-year-old girl at the beginning of our story is one of these students. Her sister came to SOLD, scared, and told them about the trafficker. A thousand dollars is a near life-changing sum in the hills of northern Thailand, especially for a family in hard times, as theirs was. Many girls, too many, have been taken in by such shiny, empty promises.

But this 14-year-old girl said no. She told the SOLD staff later that she remembered the the anti-trafficking training she’d been given and she simply told the woman no. And the next morning, instead of going to a brothel, she went to school.

I don’t think it’s exaggerating to say that her life was saved.

This is what Rachel is after, that more girls, indeed all girls, have the education and opportunity to say no. “This is our message,” she says, “that child prostitution and exploitation can be prevented, and we all have a roll to play in ensuring that prevention.” And somehow her simple story about a girl in northern Thailand, more than a raft of statistics and annual reports, makes me think she must be right. 

The Rachel, Ember Arts

All this July we’re giving 50% of our online sales to The SOLD Project in Rachel’s honor. And this necklace is a special, limited edition piece we’ve designed to represent SOLD’s work to prevent human trafficking.

The necklace is made of two types of recycled paper beads: black beads, which represent the dangers of trafficking, and beads made from old books, which represent the stories that SOLD are helping their students live.

There are four sections of story beads along the necklaces sides, representing the four pillars of SOLD’s work: Education, Mentorship, Resources, and Awareness. And there are 140 beads in total, representing the 140 students SOLD currently has on scholarship. And the necklace transitions from dark in the back, through the four pillars, to bright stories in the front. It represents Rachel’s dream and The SOLD Project’s continuing mission to lead children out of trafficking’s dark halls and into the light of opportunity.