Beads that buy hope

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What are your top three dreams?

This is a question we like to ask here at Ember. It’s a question we asked of our artisans in Uganda at the very beginning of our partnership. There is hardly a more beautiful sight than the radiance of an African woman’s face when she lights up and shares her dreams.

And it’s amazing that the women still dream. After surviving the brutality of civil war, poverty, domestic violence, and social injustice their dreams are fully fueled. The women each have individual, unique, and inspiring dreams, but one thing made it to the top three of every single one of their lists.

Education.

We asked each of our partners what she was dreaming of, and every women answered with dreams of education. Stella dreams of seeing her children graduate from university. Agnes dreams of owning a computer and finishing her own schooling. Lucy has nieces and nephews who she wants to purchase school uniforms for.

The women have dreams and incredible work ethics, now all they need is our support.

This is why Ember Arts is so proud to introduce our Library Bead Collection. Made from recycled book pages, the jewelry is a testament of hope. With every purchase of Ember Arts jewelry, our Ugandan partners are one step closer to earning the finances they need to fund their dreams of education.

We hope that the Library Bead Collection will inspire you to make a difference in the lives of Ugandan women, remind you of the value of education, and take you deeper into the journey of cultivating beautiful dreams.

Library Bead Collection Look Book 

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The word: what does “sustainability” really mean?

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Sustainability. It’s a buzz word, a word we hear so often.

We hear it used by environmentalists, politicians, fortune 500 companies, and our hipster friends. We hear this word nearly every day and yet do we ever hear anyone really define it? Do we know what sustainability really means?

At Ember Arts we talk about sustainability quite a bit. It’s something we strive for, it’s in our mission statement, it’s what we value.

Now sustainability can mean something different to different people. But we wanted to let you in to the world of Ember, to what sustainability means to us.

What sustainability means to Ember Arts.

At Ember Arts we believe that sustainability applies to the way we care for the earth and also the people around us. We think it’s so important to create products in ways that will protect natural resources, promote reusing and up-cycling materials, and discourage waste. 

We also believe that sustainability should not just be an ecological goal, but also a relational one. At Ember Arts, we want to build sustainable relationships with people — friendships that last and thrive. By being compassionate, steadfast, and authentic we believe that whole communities of people can work together to achieve positive social change. 

“Sustainability is our long term goal. We want Ember Arts to be a launching point for the women we work with in Uganda and for our family and staff here in America. We want to see their time with Ember build skill sets, confidence, and self worth that allows them to move forward, dream big, and accomplish any goal.”

- Jessica Connolly, Ember Arts Co-Founder

We are enabling 28 Ugandan women to live sustainable lives.

When you really break it down, the word sustainable is all about support, strength, longevity, and the ability to continually survive and thrive. This is what Ember Arts strives to be for our Ugandan partners. Before Ember Arts existed, our artisans worked in a rock quarry where they would sit in the hot sun with a makeshift hammer, pounding stones into gravel. Making less than $1 a day, the women were barely able to stay alive.

Now, with the money they make from Ember Arts, the women’s lives are being sustained. They have enough food on the table, they’re building homes, their children are going to school, and they are investing money into new businesses. These women, their families, and their entire community are now living sustainable lives.

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How we practice sustainability in our business.

Although we’re not perfect, and we’re learning new business practices everyday, Ember Arts does several things in an effort to be sustainable.

For instance, we have a tiny office with just the essentials, enabling us to keep our wastes to a minimum and save  on resources like electricity and water.

Most of us who work at Ember Arts, live in the community where our office is, which means we ride our bikes and walk to work. Sustainable commuting!

And probably the most important way we incorporate sustainability in our business is through the design of our jewelry. Apart from things like metal clasps and earring hooks, all of the materials we use in creating Ember jewelry are up-cycled and recycled goods. Using materials that are locally sourced like recycled paper, seeds, and wood, our designs are extremely sustainable, cost effective, and leave no waste.

Next time you hear the word sustainability, ask yourself what it could mean, and what you can do to practice sustainable living.

Ember Ambassadors West Coast Road Trip!

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Did you know that Ember Arts is a family owned and operated business?

Clayton and Jessica Connolly (together with their parents, daughters, siblings, an artist in Uganda, and a couple of college students) bring life to the business and story of Ember Arts. Together they are empowering dreamers and working to build a compassionate, sustainable network of individuals who can make a positive impact in their world.

During the whole month of August the Connolly family is taking the Ember Arts story and hitting the road. They’re calling this adventure the Ember Ambassadors West Coast Road Trip.

Read some more about Ember Ambassadors as the Connolly’s share their plans for their road trip:

What are three reasons why you are taking your family and your business on a month-long road trip? 

1. We simply love being on the road and seeing new places. Our girls have so much fun playing road games like “I Spy” and blasting music while singing along. We also believe that traveling to new places and seeing new sites is so enriching to young minds. We want our daughters to grow up knowing how big the world is and valuing every single person they come across during life.

2. Ember Arts is in a stage of expansion, a time when we are striving to grow our business and further our sphere of influence. Simply put, we want to see our jewelry sold in more stores, so we’re going out adventuring in search of those new partners.

3. Also, from past experiences we’ve learned that individuals are more likely to purchase a product when they can shake the hand of the person who is selling. We so value meeting with people face to face, sharing stories, and building relationships. We want to be as authentic and intentional as possible when interacting with our partners and customers. What a better way to build relationships than to simply stop by and say hi.

Meet the Connolly family - Clayton, Jessica, Kairah, Shiloh, and River. If you're on the West Coast, be keeping your eyes out for them.

Meet the Connolly family – Clayton, Jessica, Kairah, Shiloh, and River. If you’re on the West Coast, be keeping your eyes out for them.

Give us a glimpse into your travel plans. What will you be doing? 

Our plan is to drive up the West Coast of the United States, starting in our home base of  San Diego and ending in Seattle. We are hoping to stop in as many towns and cities as possible, meeting with retail store owners. We’ll shake lots of hands, pass out business cards, and give away free jewelry, all with the intention of sharing the Ember Arts story.

Your road trip sounds amazing! How can I join in on the fun? 

We would love to have you become a part of the Ember Ambassadors story. Here a couple of ways you can join us.

1. Follow us on Instagram (@emberarts) and on Facebook (search Ember Arts) to see fun photos of our trip.

2. Help us make our travel plans, tell us where we should go! Do you have a favorite boutique, bookstore, or gift shop on the West Coast that you think should sell Ember Arts jewelry? Let us know and we’ll try to stop by that store. You can send us your thoughts by emailing info@emberarts.com or commenting on any of our social media posts.

Designing Jewelry, Inspiring Dreams

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This is Emily Grace Goodrich — designer and dreamer. She is the creative mind behind Ember Arts and has served as our jewelry designer in Kampala, Uganda for the past five years. She brings color, vibrancy, and ingenuity to both our products and the Ember Arts story.

Not a single day is the same for Emily, living in Uganda, though every morning she wakes to the sound of chickens clucking. She will often take a white minivan taxi into town to visit the Owina Market, where she searches for used paper and old books to use in Ember Arts designs. Several times a week she travels to the outskirts of the city to a neighborhood called Acholi Quarters, where the women of Ember Arts work and live. Emily is there to conduct meetings and train the women on crafting jewelry. It is a lifestyle she loves — something so much more than a job.

We are so very proud to have Emily on our team and are grateful for the beauty she brings to the Ember Arts family.

Ember Arts: You studied Interdisciplinary Studio Arts in college – do any of the skills you learned in school influence the way you design Ember Arts jewelry?

Emily Goodrich: I think there are similarities in some ways. I mostly studied painting and photography, but things like color and pattern and line are applicable across all creative fields. I think my designs are a lot more influenced by the ebb and flow of materials into Uganda. It’s tricky to figure out which jewelry components will be available in the local markets consistently; and so more and more, I’m trying to look toward alternative sorts of materials. 

emilyWhat is something you’ve learned from the Ugandan women you work with?

I’ve definitely learned a lot about hospitality and resilience from them, but lately, we’ve been learning together the value of celebration. This last year has had its fair share of bumps and challenges for the group and for individuals in it, but we’ve decided to start bringing a little fun into our meetings. We threw a small party the last time an order shipped to the U.S., and had refreshments and played a few silly games. The ladies have decided that this should be standard: they’re usually focused on business, and they realized that it’s important to enjoy each other’s presence.

 

When you talk to your friends and family in America, what is one thing you wish they would know or understand about the state of life in Uganda? 

No matter how many times I say otherwise, people still think I live in a mud hut. There are certainly people here that do, but Uganda is growing and changing. It’s a place of strange juxtapositions.

Uganda has its fair share of dirt roads, slums, and political struggles, but every single one of the women we work with has a mobile phone, and they know how to send text messages and mobile money. A lot of them have TVs and stereos in their homes, and are sitting and watching Columbian telenovelas and other international television shows during lunch. There are also opportunities for entrepreneurs and enterprising folks everywhere. 

This is why I think the work that we’re doing at Ember Arts  is so important. Most of the Ember ladies are content to move back to the village one day, but their children are going to inherit this new world of technology and rapidly changing information — even here in Uganda. When these women who we work with are able to send their kids  to secondary schools and universities, I think it helps to ensure those children a voice in the future of their country.

There is a lot of room to do some good in the world with our purchasing power.

 

Someday you’ll be moving away from Kampala. What’s next on your list of adventures? What are you dreaming of doing? 

I really enjoy “making things,” so I think I’ll always be interested in the way that human beings interact with one another as consumers and producers. There is a lot of room to do some good in the world with our purchasing power. There are also a lot of ways to do harm. Eventually, I’d love to figure out how to make those ideas more accessible to people, especially when the assumption is that things like organic and fair trade have to equal expensive. There’s a whole lot for me to think through before I have any concrete steps, but I’ve been fortunate to have some amazing experiences in those areas. I’d love to share them in a tangible way, with a blog or maybe even a retail space.

What is one piece of advice you can give to others who are dreaming of making a positive impact on the world? 

Stop dreaming about it, and just start moving forward. I often find myself getting stuck in the realm of “maybe someday,” and I’m learning that even baby steps will get you there faster than waiting for the right time or enough resources. If you need money, start putting change in a jar. If you’re waiting for more free time, spend just fifteen minutes a day working toward that goal. Little things add up.

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Ember Mother: Paska

Nearly all of the women we partner with through Ember Arts are mothers, and part of the privilege of working with them is the opportunity to see their children grow throughout the years. We frequently have babies and toddlers teetering through the office, and during training sessions, older children stop buy regularly to deliver messages from home and watch their mothers at work.

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Achiro Paska’s two youngest daughters, Emily and Evelin, have been staples at our meetings over the last few years, and she was happy to be asked to show them off and speak more about their lives.

When prompted to share her favorite part about being a mother, Paska couldn’t choose; from pregnancy to teenagers, so far, she’s loved it all. With six children from ages 14 months to 14 years,  she has certainly seen motherhood from many different angles. While she admits to getting annoyed when her children are quarreling with each other, most days she is happy to see them playing well together. They even have a favorite game that she couldn’t quite explain through her laughter, apparently it’s so funny that even the thought of it makes her giggle.

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Paska herself was left with relatives at the age of three, and grew up without a mother. She is determined to live her life differently, no matter what sort of trials she faces. Her advice to other mothers is “Love your children, whatever you are facing, and educate them. If you educate and love them it is good, because they are the future.”

She is most proud of her children when they do well in school,  and working to earn money for their school fees is her greatest concern. Her dream is that they will all finish their educations, and never have to struggle the way she did growing up. 

We are thrilled to be partnering alongside hard-working mothers like Paska, and so grateful for the support of all the women- mothers and otherwise- that help make those dreams a reality.

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Partner Update: Gladies’ New Business

Join our contest on Pinterest to win a Mabira Necklace!gladies_portraitGladies is one of our first partners, which means she’s been working with us for the last five years. We affectionately refer to her as ‘Special Teams’ because she’s smart, dependable, and can get just about anything done. Recently she made a big step towards her dreams by starting her own small business.

Gladies fled from her family home in Amuru, an area in northern Uganda, about a decade ago during the civil war. When she first arrived in the Acholi Quarters community of Uganda’s capital city it was only a collection of mud huts around a stone quarry, where men, women, and children could do hard labor for about $1 per day. That’s what Gladies did to pull her family through.

These days Acholi Quarters is looking a lot better, and so is Gladies’ family. She has three children, and she’s paying for all of them to attend good local schools, an expensive feat in Uganda’s capital.

cover_gladies_smallAnd now Gladies is using her earnings from Ember Arts to expand her earning potential, too. She recently traveled back to Amuru and bought a rice milling machine, and rented a place in a big trading center to collect, mill, and sell rice. Farmers come for miles around to sell their harvest to her.

She partnered with her brother in the business, so now his family is benefiting, too. And they have big plans for the future.

Gladies and her brother plan to put up their own commercial building in the trading center, a place where they can process and store not just rice, but other crops, too. Building, she says, will start in December.

Like most of our partners here in Uganda, Gladies wants to eventually move back to her family home. With the money she’s earned and skills she’s learned as an Ember partner, she’s well on her way to accomplishing that dream.

 

Ember Partner: Tukula

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Jinja, the source of the Nile, is a major tourist destination in Uganda. With whitewater rafting, bungee jumping, and beautiful views of the river to occupy your time, you might overlook the town itself and the growing textile industry found there, which is turning out some of the most spectacular weaving and tailoring I’ve seen in Uganda. Through the windows of one small shop along a main road, you’ll often see Sally, a tailor, hard at work behind her pedal-operated sewing machine; the word “Tukula” painted on the wall behind her.

In the local language, Tukula means “we grow,” and that is precisely what Sally and her co-workers are doing as they refine their tailoring skills and learn to believe in a better future for themselves. Sally, who is newly married and does not yet have children of her own, dreams of one day opening her own tailoring shop in her home village. For now, she is happy to be able to help her father pay school fees for her younger siblings, to make sure they will have opportunities to succeed. Founder Melissa Terranova has worked tirelessly to promote the talents of these women, and makes sure they are provided with fair salaries, medical care, and access to savings programs.

This year, Ember Arts has partnered with Tukula to make colorful kitinge headwraps, which you can find in our shop online. We believe that Tukula’s mission lines up perfectly with our vision, and have been excited about this opportunity to work with them. In their words, “There is so much potential for people if you just give them a chance to dream. We’ve seen first-hand how quickly circumstances can change for young women by giving them that chance. After getting to know the ladies of Tukula, we realized they have dreams beyond their sewing machines. Whether they want to buy livestock or teach others how to sew, Tukula is dedicated to giving these ladies the opportunity to reach their goals.”

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Do More Than Just Shop

[Thanks to Caava Design for the beautiful posters. See below for the full collection.]

Getting gifts is good. Giving is better. But best of all is investing in the people you care about.

Today, Black Friday, is a blemish on America. After a day of family and gratefulness we trample each other in pursuit of stuff we don’t need.

We do need gifts from each other. And buying something thoughtful for another person can be a wonderful gesture of relationship. But the gifts we really need can’t be bought.

We need each other’s presence. We need encouraging words and warm hugs. We need forgiveness and generosity and understanding and the assurance that, no matter what, I’ll be there for you.

We need the sometimes difficult recognition of our equal humanity regardless of which continent we were born in, what color our skin takes, how much money we do or don’t have, or any other factor that tends to separate us.

If you are going to buy gifts, it’s better to invest in products that make a positive difference. A few companies we recommend: Krochet KidsSseko, Mend, Plywood, and of course Ember.

Buying from these companies makes the world a little better, but it’s just a start. Do more than just shop. Give the things you can’t buy: your time, your attention, your heart. You have so much more to give.

Do More Than Just Shop

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Stella’s Long Dream

[As you browse our online store this season you'll see a beautiful Ugandan woman modeling our jewelry. This is Stella. She is one of 28 Ugandan women who handcraft every piece of jewelry we sell. This is her story. Thanks for helping her write it.]

Stella with her Family

Stella’s beautiful daughter Susan just started ‘baby class,’ Uganda’s version of kindergarten. But it would be hard to understand how much this means to Stella without first knowing about Internally Displaced Person’s camps.

Stella was raised in northern Uganda at the height of Joseph Kony’s terrible rebellion. His soldiers, many of them abducted as children themselves, killed three of her brothers. That’s when her family moved into a nearby IDP camp.

 

‘The camps were the burial grounds of dreams.’

 

These camps were ostensibly planned for the protection of families like Stella’s, but were often more deadly than the rebels. Thousands of poor farming families were crammed into close quarters with no education, healthcare, opportunity. For food people relied on the UN to delivers sacks of corn flour and beans. Malnourishment and disease ruled people’s lives. The camps were the burial grounds of dreams.

But Stella made it out. She met her future husband in the camp and he decided to make his way to Kampala, Uganda’s peaceful capital city, to look for work. Four years later she followed him. Life in Kampala was better, said Stella. There were no gunshots at night and people weren’t sick all the time.

But still there was poverty. She worked hard in a local rock quarry, pounding stones into gravel to scrape out rent and put food on the table. Then suddenly she was pregnant, and worried that she wouldn’t be able to provide her baby with food, healthcare, the education that Stella herself never had.

At this moment of great hope and fear, we met Stella near the rock quarry and she joined Ember Arts.

With her new income from making jewelry she quickly organized a proper wedding with her husband. Soon little Susan was born into a family brimming with new hope. Stella and her husband helped pay school fees for six relatives as Susan grew and their son Jonathan was born. Today Stella has goals of building her family a house back in the north, now that it’s peaceful, and of opening a produce business.

But her greatest dream is to educate her children, to provide Susan and Jonathan with the sort of opportunity that did not exist back in the IDP camps. And now, seven years after leaving the camp, that dream is coming true.

Ember Hero Giveaway!

We believe in heroes. Not the mutant, alien, superpower kind, but the real kind. The kind of people that make the world better, if only a little bit at a time. Like our Ugandan partners, women working their tails off to chase their dreams and build better futures for their families. And Becky Straw, who has made huge sacrifices to create good jobs in the developing world.

Who are the heroes in your life? Do you have a friend or sister or teacher or mom who has made all the difference? Is there someone you know who is chasing her dreams and inspiring you to do the same? Take a moment to tell them they are a hero, and through our Ember Hero Giveaway you could win two pairs of our brand new Jinja Bangles! A pair for you and a pair for your hero.

Just follow these quick steps:
1) Click on this photo to go to Facebook:

2) Tag your hero in a comment on the photo, and tell them what makes them a hero. Comment as many times as you want, and please only tag one friend per comment. (If you can’t comment, ‘like’ Ember Arts first.)
3) The winner, announced next week, will win two pairs of our brand new Jinja Bangles! A pair for your and a pair for your hero.

We all need heroes, and luckily they’re all around us. Take a minute to tag a hero, and good luck in the giveaway!